Final Project: Anti-Trump Protest Photo Essay

trump-leader

This is the leader of the DC Anti-Fascist Coalition speaking to the press about the protest. The contrast between complete darkness behind her, and the intense light on her face is the focus on the photo. It also employs rule of thirds.

trump-diversity-guy

This is an establishing shot to provide context that this is an Anti-Trump protest about diversity in America by featuring a man holding a banner that plays of Trump’s slogan “Make America Great Again, but saying, “Diversity makes  America Great.” Without having to do a extremely wide shot of all the protesters, I still establish the scene especially since my focus is on individual protesters. This photo also employs rule of thirds.

trump-cute-couple1

This shot really embodies the themes of the protest and the theme of my photo essay which is love and unity. This very cute couple was dancing and smiling throughout the whole protest and I wanted to capture their love and happiness. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the couple and not the protesters/dancers behind them. Again, rule of thirds. trump-facist-free-2

To add variety to the shots, I did three shots that did not include a person’s face, and this is one of them. This photo is meant to drive home the message of the protest: they wanted a fascist free DC and America. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the sign and the hands which signify that there is still a person behind every protest.

trump-metro-2

To further establish the scene and the characters of the protest, I included this wide shot from a low angle taken from the bottom of the metro escalators. This shot is also meant to establish that it was a mobile protest that moved from location to location. The leading lines add to the focus of the shot which are the people protesting.

trump-gay-2

Another loving shot from a different couple, which is also meant to highlight the love and unity of the protest. I had a million shots of this cute couple looking happy and loving, so it was hard to choose this one, but I like the white ceiling of the metro because it contrasted well with their black and rainbow outfits. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the couple and not the protesters/dancers behind them. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-yeller

Anger. To add variety again, I added a new, but very common emotion at this protest: anger. People were screaming, yelling, and chanting, and this embodies that. Because that is the “darker” side of protest I kept the picture dark and raised its contrast. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the woman yelling and not the protesters behind her. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-pence-2

Pardon my language, but this girl looked badass, and I had to capture it. It is the only “posed” picture and it is taken head on to show that she is not afraid of anything. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on her and not the protesters behind her.

trump-thinker-2More emotion variety is shown in this photo of a man looking particularly concerned, and looking off the photo to the right (almost like he is looking into the future). This picture is meant to be more symbolic to represent that these protests will not stop and they will continue to fight fascism in America. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the man and not the protesters behind him. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-poser-2

Strike a pose. This is another leader of the coalition, mainly the dance leader; he kept everyone on their feet, and dancing. He danced the entire five hours, and I wanted to highlight him, so I captured this shot from a low angle making him look this a person of royalty (he referred to himself as queen) and really showing his sass and beauty. This highlights the dancing aspect of the protest; this photo was shot during “Vogue” by Madonna. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-flag-2

This the only shot I took of this man without him making silly faces at me; he was having a good time, but he did have some serious moments ,such as, this one. His flag said “Anti-Fascist Action,” but I did not think that was neccessary to show because at this point we know what they were fighting for. This also shows that there is a theme in dress of the protesters: hats and bandanas. This was not only because it was cold, but also because they were afraid of getting on the surveillance cameras and getting arrested. I kept this photo relatively dark because I felt that kept the picture serious, and gave it a militaristic tone.

trump-rainbow

The contrast between dark and rainbow in this one is very visually appealing. I chose to feature the back of his head because rainbow was a theme of the protest, because of its connections to LGBTQ+ groups, and his hat showed that. It also uses a shallow depth of field to really place focus on the man and not the protesters behind him. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-muslim

Her appearance matched her sign very well whether it was intended or not. The connection between her outfit, looking like a hijab, to the “white supremacy” creates intrigue, at least to me. Also, the all black outfit adds variety in between they two rainbow shots, and draws on the anger I described earlier.

trump-feminist

To add variety to the shots, I did three shots that did not include a person’s face, and this is another one of them; however, I still wanted to highlight the person’s character so I focused on the “feminist” button. Additionally, all the colors popped making it a visually appealing photo, and it draws on two themes of the dress code: Rainbow suspenders and bandanas. Again, rule of thirds.

trump-sign-2

To add variety to the shots, I did three shots that did not include a person’s face, and this is another one of them; however, I still wanted to highlight the message of the protest, and the future of these types of power. By covering her face, it effectively shows that these protests will not stop until equality is reached no matter how many different people it takes. Even if she stops protesting, some one else does. The bus blurred in the background, shows the life keeps moving by, but these people will always be fighting. Again, rule of thirds.

 

Story Behind the Photo Essay:

When Donald Trump was announced as the President-elect of the United States, protests against Trump and his values were sparked all across the country. Protests against Trump and his beliefs were occurring all the way leading up to election night, but election lit the fire for many protesters across the country. Major liberal cities across the country, specifically Los Angeles, New York City, Detroit, and Washington DC, were particularly enraged and ready to fight America’s choice.

Various types of protests were arranged. Purely anti-Trump protest, anti-fascism and anti-white supremacy protests, Not my president protests, walkouts at high schools and colleges, pro-choice protests, and protests encouraging Obama to select the next Supreme Court justice before Trump gets to office. Additionally, LGBTQ+ groups and supporters protested Trump’s vice president, Pence. Trump Towers all over the country were stormed by anti-Trump protests with signs and chants. People were terrified, angry, and ready to voice all their concerns. The nation’s capital saw a huge influx in protests all over the city, specifically at Trump’s new hotel, the National Mall, and the White House.

The DC Anti-Fascist Coalition,  organized a protest on Friday, November 18, 2016 in front of Trump Towers to fight against “Trumpism,” Trump’s “Alt-Right” base, and the racist, sexist, and anti-immigrant hate. The DC Anti-Fascist Coalition is an anti-racist, anti-fascist coalition that commits to doing the necessary work to build a broad, strong movement against racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, discrimination against the disabled, the oldest, the youngest, and the most oppressed people. The protest was a mobile flash mob dance protest intended to start at Trump Towers, but then go disrupt a supremacist group that was looking to celebrate Tump wherever they went. The specific group they were protesting was the National Policy Institute (NPI), a white nationalist “think-tank” that has been designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. They were holding their white supremacist conference in DC the weekend of November 18th-20th, 2016. NPI openly supports Trump, Trumpism, and the racism, white supremacy, sexism, and Islamophobia that goes with it. They are fighting Trump’s rise because it has given voice to a brutal side of the US population. It’s emboldened the racist violence that oppresses people of color, divides us from each other, and keeps us from making a common fight for freedom and equity.

For their protest, they chanted and danced. They chanted phrases like, “No Nazi, No KKK, No Fascist USA,” and dancing to songs like Lady Gaga’s, “Born Like This.” The leader of organization said, “we dance because dance is resistance.” The protest started at the Trump Towers, and then when the the coalition got word that the NPI white supremacists were celebrating at Maggiano’s Little Italy Restaurant in Friendship Heights, the group of protesters marched down the streets, stopping traffic, to the metro, where they used the red line to get to the restaurant. Once everyone was at the restaurant, the protesters marched into the restaurant and chanted at the white supremacists in their private party room. When restuarant security and police escorted the protesters outside, the dance protest continued outside the restaurant for another two hours.

The coalition’s goal in these protests is to “ensure that justice, not hate, emerges from these dangerous times.” Their leader stated, “to win in this struggle, we must tell hate groups like NPI that they are not welcome here – or anywhere! We want a classless, free society. We intend to win!” The signs reflected their goals by including phrases such as, “Diversity makes America great, ” “Black Lives Matter,” “Keep DC Fascist Free,” “Electroshock Pence,” “Resist Fascism and White Supremacy,” “No to Racism and Fascism” It was a night of protest, fight, love, dance, and unity. In the protest for hate, everyone united, accepted each other, and provided love and support, all while dancing the night away.

In my photo essay, I tried to capture the diverse group of protesters and their emotions, as well as, the unity, love, and dancing of the protest. I wanted to humanize the protest by showing specific faces and emotions of the protesters. I wanted to demonstrate the range and diversity of the protesters by showing men and women, different races, different sexualities, and different emotions, from angry to happy to concerned and more. I wanted to create the movement and joy of the people without just showing a ton of blurry photos.

The arrangement of the photos are chronologically, starting with the protesters at the Trump Towers, to the protesters in the metro station to the protesters outside of the restaurant. I composed the photos of faces, using a lot rule of thirds for visual appeal and a shallow depth of field for focus on the subjects and people I wanted to highlight. The darkness was a bit of a road block, but there were street lamps near the hotel that create pockets of light, some overhead lighting in the metro, and lights under the canopy in front of the restaurant that created pockets of lights that I took advantage of. Additionally, I increased my ISO to help remedy the low light situation which is why many of the photos have a lot of noise and grain to them. I lowered the f-stop and widened my aperture to allow more light in and create a shallow depth of field. I also used a variety of wide, medium, close-up, and extreme close-up shots. Overall, my goals was to capture the character of the protest, as well as, the individual character of many of the protesters.

 

When Donald Trump was announced as the President-elect of the United States, protests against Trump and his values were sparked all across the country. Protests against Trump and his beliefs were occurring all the way leading up to election night, but election lit the fire for many protesters across the country. Major liberal cities across the country, specifically Los Angeles, New York City, Detroit, and Washington DC, were particularly enraged and ready to fight America’s choice.

Various types of protests were arranged. Purely anti-Trump protest, anti-fascism and anti-white supremacy protests, Not my president protests, walkouts at high schools and colleges, pro-choice protests, and protests encouraging Obama to select the next Supreme Court justice before Trump gets to office. Additionally, LGBTQ+ groups and supporters protested Trump’s vice president, Pence. Trump Towers all over the country were stormed by anti-Trump protests with signs and chants. People were terrified, angry, and ready to voice all their concerns. The nation’s capital saw a huge influx in protests all over the city, specifically at Trump’s new hotel, the National Mall, and the White House.

The DC Anti-Fascist Coalition,  organized a protest on Friday, November 18, 2016 in front of Trump Towers to fight against “Trumpism,” Trump’s “Alt-Right” base, and the racist, sexist, and anti-immigrant hate. The DC Anti-Fascist Coalition is an anti-racist, anti-fascist coalition that commits to doing the necessary work to build a broad, strong movement against racism, sexism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, homophobia, transphobia, discrimination against the disabled, the oldest, the youngest, and the most oppressed people. The protest was a mobile flash mob dance protest intended to start at Trump Towers, but then go disrupt a supremacist group that was looking to celebrate Tump wherever they went. The specific group they were protesting was the National Policy Institute (NPI), a white nationalist “think-tank” that has been designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. They were holding their white supremacist conference in DC the weekend of November 18th-20th, 2016. NPI openly supports Trump, Trumpism, and the racism, white supremacy, sexism, and Islamophobia that goes with it. They are fighting Trump’s rise because it has given voice to a brutal side of the US population. It’s emboldened the racist violence that oppresses people of color, divides us from each other, and keeps us from making a common fight for freedom and equity.

For their protest, they chanted and danced. They chanted phrases like, “No Nazi, No KKK, No Fascist USA,” and dancing to songs like Lady Gaga’s, “Born Like This.” The leader of organization said, “we dance because dance is resistance.” The protest started at the Trump Towers, and then when the the coalition got word that the NPI white supremacists were celebrating at Maggiano’s Little Italy Restaurant in Friendship Heights, the group of protesters marched down the streets, stopping traffic, to the metro, where they used the red line to get to the restaurant. Once everyone was at the restaurant, the protesters marched into the restaurant and chanted at the white supremacists in their private party room. When restaurant security and police escorted the protesters outside, the dance protest continued outside the restaurant for another two hours.

The coalition’s goal in these protests is to “ensure that justice, not hate, emerges from these dangerous times.” Their leader stated, “to win in this struggle, we must tell hate groups like NPI that they are not welcome here – or anywhere! We want a classless, free society. We intend to win!” The signs reflected their goals by including phrases such as, “Diversity makes America great, ” “Black Lives Matter,” “Keep DC Fascist Free,” “Electroshock Pence,” “Resist Fascism and White Supremacy,” “No to Racism and Fascism” It was a night of protest, fight, love, dance, and unity. In the protest for hate, everyone united, accepted each other, and provided love and support, all while dancing the night away.

In my photo essay, I tried to capture the diverse group of protesters and their emotions, as well as, the unity, love, and dancing of the protest. I wanted to humanize the protest by showing specific faces and emotions of the protesters. I wanted to demonstrate the range and diversity of the protesters by showing men and women, different races, different sexualities, and different emotions, from angry to happy to concerned and more. I wanted to create the movement and joy of the people without just showing a ton of blurry photos.

The arrangement of the photos are chronologically, starting with the protesters at the Trump Towers, to the protesters in the metro station to the protesters outside of the restaurant. I composed the photos of faces, using a lot rule of thirds for visual appeal and a shallow depth of field for focus on the subjects and people I wanted to highlight. The darkness was a bit of a road block, but there were street lamps near the hotel that create pockets of light, some overhead lighting in the metro, and lights under the canopy in front of the restaurant that created pockets of lights that I took advantage of. Additionally, I increased my ISO to help remedy the low light situation which is why many of the photos have a lot of noise and grain to them. I lowered the f-stop and widened my aperture to allow more light in and create a shallow depth of field. I also used a variety of wide, medium, close-up, and extreme close-up shots. Overall, my goals was to capture the character of the protest, as well as, the individual character of many of the protesters.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s